Lemon Law Attorney in San Mateo County, CA – Lawyers specializing in Lemon Law

GOT A LEMON? There is nothing more aggravating then buying a car that has problem after problem and the dealer or garage just can’t seem to fix it. And when you try to get your money back or trade it in, you get ignored, excuses are made and nothing is done.

If You Have a Problem Call Us

Get something done now. Talk to a San Mateo County Lemon Law Attorney. Tell us what the problem is by calling us at Toll Free 1-888-754-9875, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. HABLAMOS ESPANOL.


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MONEY Back
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Our Case Evaluation is Free

The call and the advice we give you are absolutely free!!! YOU PAY NO FEE TO US. Under the law, it is the manufacturer who is required to pay us our fee, not you!!

Get the Remedy You Deserve

Once our San Mateo County lemon law attorneys evaluate your case, let us see what we can do to get you cash, a full refund or a replacement vehicle!!

And Used Cars Can be Lemons Too!!

What is a Lemon under California's Lemon Law?

Your car is legally considered to be a “lemon” if the manufacturer has made 4 or more attempts to repair the same problem or your car has been out of service for at least 30 days while under repair for any number of problems. You must have brought your car in for repairs within the car’s first 18,000 miles or within 18-months of receiving the vehicle or within the warranty period, which can be longer.

If the problem is one that substantially impairs the car’s value, poses a risk of death or serious bodily injury, then the number of attempts to repair it is only 2. In other words, the more serious the problem, the less number of repairs are required.

Should you car fit any of these conditions, your car is legally presumed to be a lemon that the manufacturer can only rebut by claiming that:

  • there has not been a reasonable number of attempts to repair the problem
  • the problem is not covered by the warranty
  • the problem does not substantially impair the car’s value, use or pose a serious safety risk

What Vehicles are Covered?

The California Lemon Law, called the Song-Beverly Consumer Warranty Law, covers not only passenger vehicles but trucks, vans, the chassis or cab of a motorhome bought for personal use and some vehicles used primarily for business.

There are Other Possible Remedies Available to You

If the state Lemon Law is not applicable to your case, we will determine if other remedies are available such as the California Consumer Legal Remedies Act or the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act. If there is a breach of warranty, you could be compensated.

Remember-There is no out-of pocket cost to you and you pay no attorney’s fees

Manufacturers hate this law. With an attorney on your side, you can have your remedy and the problem resolved. Even if the repairs are for a relatively minor defect, there may be something peculiar to your car or situation where we can help you.

Let our San Mateo County Lemon Law lawyers help you determine if your car’s history or problems and repairs fits within the conditions of the law. Call us toll free at 1-888-754-9875 for your free evaluation.


About San Mateo County

San Mateo County (/ˌsæn məˈteɪ.oʊ/ san mə-tay-oh; Spanish for "Saint Matthew") is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California. It covers most of the San Francisco Peninsula just south of San Francisco, and north of Santa Clara County. San Francisco International Airport is located at the northern end of the county, and Silicon Valley begins at the southern end. As of 2010 the population was 718,451. The county seat is Redwood City. It is ethnically diverse, and affluent. The county's built-up areas are mostly suburban with some areas being very urban, and are home to several corporate campuses.

San Mateo County was formed in 1856 after San Francisco County, one of state's 18 original counties since California's statehood in 1850, was split apart. Until 1856, San Francisco's city limits extended west to Divisadero Street and Castro Street, and south to 20th Street. In response to the lawlessness and vigilantism that escalated rapidly between 1855 and 1856, the California government decided to divide the county. A straight line was then drawn across the tip of the San Francisco Peninsula just north of San Bruno Mountain. Everything south of the line became the new San Mateo County while everything north of the line became the new consolidated City and County of San Francisco, to date the only consolidated city-county in California. San Mateo County then annexed part of northern Santa Cruz County in 1868.

San Mateo county bears the Spanish name for Saint Matthew. As a place name, San Mateo appears as early as 1776 and several local geographic features were also designated San Mateo on early maps including variously: a settlement, an arroyo, a headland jutting into the Pacific (Point Montara), and a large land holding (Rancho San Mateo). Until about 1850, the name appeared as San Matheo.

San Mateo County straddles the San Francisco Peninsula, with the Santa Cruz Mountains running its entire length. The county encompasses a variety of habitats including estuarine, marine, oak woodland, redwood forest, coastal scrub and oak savannah. There are numerous species of wildlife present, especially along the San Francisco Bay estuarine shoreline, San Bruno Mountain, Fitzgerald Marine Reserve and the forests on the Montara Mountain block. Several creeks discharge to the San Francisco Bay including San Mateo Creek and Laurel Creek and several coastal streams discharge to the Pacific Ocean such as Frenchmans Creek and San Vicente Creek.

The county is home to several endangered species including the San Francisco garter snake and the San Bruno elfin butterfly, both of which are endemic to San Mateo County. The endangered California clapper rail is also found on the shores of San Francisco Bay, in the cities of Belmont and San Mateo. The endangered wildflower Hickman's potentilla is found near the Pacific Ocean on the lower slopes of Montara Mountain. The endangered wildflowers White-rayed pentachaeta, Pentachaeta bellidiflora, San Mateo Woolly Sunflower, Eriophyllum latilobum, Marin Dwarf Flax, Hesperolinon congestum and the San Mateo Thornmint, Acanthomintha duttonii, are found in the vicinity of the Crystal Springs Reservoir.

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