Lemon Law Attorney in Kern County, CA – Lawyers specializing in Lemon Law

GOT A LEMON? There is nothing more aggravating then buying a car that has problem after problem and the dealer or garage just can’t seem to fix it. And when you try to get your money back or trade it in, you get ignored, excuses are made and nothing is done.

If You Have a Problem Call Us

Get something done now. Talk to a Kern County Lemon Law Attorney. Tell us what the problem is by calling us at Toll Free 1-888-754-9875, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. HABLAMOS ESPANOL.


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Our Case Evaluation is Free

The call and the advice we give you are absolutely free!!! YOU PAY NO FEE TO US. Under the law, it is the manufacturer who is required to pay us our fee, not you!!

Get the Remedy You Deserve

Once our Kern County lemon law attorneys evaluate your case, let us see what we can do to get you cash, a full refund or a replacement vehicle!!

And Used Cars Can be Lemons Too!!

What is a Lemon under California's Lemon Law?

Your car is legally considered to be a “lemon” if the manufacturer has made 4 or more attempts to repair the same problem or your car has been out of service for at least 30 days while under repair for any number of problems. You must have brought your car in for repairs within the car’s first 18,000 miles or within 18-months of receiving the vehicle or within the warranty period, which can be longer.

If the problem is one that substantially impairs the car’s value, poses a risk of death or serious bodily injury, then the number of attempts to repair it is only 2. In other words, the more serious the problem, the less number of repairs are required.

Should you car fit any of these conditions, your car is legally presumed to be a lemon that the manufacturer can only rebut by claiming that:

  • there has not been a reasonable number of attempts to repair the problem
  • the problem is not covered by the warranty
  • the problem does not substantially impair the car’s value, use or pose a serious safety risk

What Vehicles are Covered?

The California Lemon Law, called the Song-Beverly Consumer Warranty Law, covers not only passenger vehicles but trucks, vans, the chassis or cab of a motorhome bought for personal use and some vehicles used primarily for business.

There are Other Possible Remedies Available to You

If the state Lemon Law is not applicable to your case, we will determine if other remedies are available such as the California Consumer Legal Remedies Act or the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act. If there is a breach of warranty, you could be compensated.

Remember-There is no out-of pocket cost to you and you pay no attorney’s fees

Manufacturers hate this law. With an attorney on your side, you can have your remedy and the problem resolved. Even if the repairs are for a relatively minor defect, there may be something peculiar to your car or situation where we can help you.

Let our Kern County Lemon Law lawyers help you determine if your car’s history or problems and repairs fits within the conditions of the law. Call us toll free at 1-888-754-9875 for your free evaluation.


About Kern County

Kern County is a county spanning the southern end of the California Central Valley. Covering 8,161.42 square miles (21,138.0 km2), it ranges west to the southern slope of the Coast Ranges, and east beyond the southern slope of the eastern Sierra Nevada into the Mojave Desert. The population of Kern County was 839,631 in 2010, making it the eleventh most populous county in the state. Its county seat is Bakersfield. The county's economy is heavily linked to agriculture and to petroleum extraction. There is also strong aviation, space, and military presence, such as Edwards Air Force Base and China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station.

The area was claimed by the Spanish in 1769, and in 1772 Commander Don Pedro Fages became the first European to enter it, from the south by way of the Grapevine Canyon.

Kern County was the site of the Battle of San Emigdio, in March 1824, between the Chumash Indians of the Santa Barbara Mission who rebelled against the Mexican government's taking over mission property and ejecting the natives. This battle with Mexican forces from Monterey under the command of Carlos Carrillo took place at the canyon where San Emigdio Creek flows down San Emigdio Mountain and the Blue Ridge south of Bakersfield near today's Highway 166. It was a low-casualty encounter, with only four Indians killed, and no Mexicans; the surviving Indians were pacified and brought back to Santa Barbara in June 1824 after a pursuit and negotiation in which many were allowed to keep their arms for the return march over the mountains.

In the beginning, the area that became Kern County was dominated by mining in the mountains and in the desert. In 1855 an attempt to form a county in the area was made when the California legislature took the southeastern territory of Tulare County on the west of the Sierra Nevada Mountains for Buena Vista County, but it was never officially organized prior to 1859, when the time of the enabling legislation ran out. The south of Tulare County was later organized as Kern County in 1866, with additions from Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. Its first county seat was in the mining town of Havilah, in the mountains between Bakersfield and Tehachapi.

The flatlands were considered inhospitable and impassable at the time due to swamps, lakes, tule reeds and diseases such as malaria. This changed when settlers started draining lands for farming and constructing canals, most dug by hand by hired Chinese laborers. Within 10 years the valley surpassed the mining areas as the economic center of the county, and the county seat was moved as a result from Havilah to Bakersfield in 1874.

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